AGS Tutorial, Confessions of a Crap GameDev

How to quickly make a 1st person FMV game in Adventure Game Studio

AdventureJam 2017 starts tomorrow. As promised, here is my second Adventure Game Studio tutorial.

Today, we’re going to learn how to make FMV games — yes, Full Motion Video games. The kind that were really popular in the mid-90s and, some would say, reduced adventure games to interactive PowerPoint presentation with laughable acting.

Only few companies got FMV right (the best of which were the Tex Murphy games like Under A Killing Moon, The Pandora Directive, and Overseer), and most of them were just overblown and ridiculous (like Take 2’s Ripper).

The acting in Ripper was “un-fuckin’-believable.”

Will you fare any better? Here’s hoping, because I’m about to teach you how.

As promised in the video, you can find the source code for the game I made here. It should be enough to get you started.

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AGS Tutorial, Confessions of a Crap GameDev

How to quickly make a Sierra/LucasArts-style game in Adventure Game Studio

AdventureJam 2017 is upon us next week! This means that adventure game developers from all around the world — the good, the bad, the smelly, and the first-time curious — will have two weeks to create an adventure game from scratch.

The beauty of the AdventureJam is that no one expects perfection. It’s just what you can knock out in two weeks. There is a ton of fun to be had with that kind of time constraint. It often forces you to go to silly places, to experiment, and to just do something for the hell of it.

I know a lot of people who say they want to make adventure games, but have no idea how. Back in August of last year, I made a series of tutorial videos that took you through the basics. They were a bit rambly and long-winded, though.

So, in anticipation of this year’s AdventureJam, I have made two new tutorial videos that are a lot more snappy — aimed at getting you started quickly.

The first one is about how to make a Sierra/LucasArts style adventure game with on-screen characters:

In this video, you’ll see me working on some scripting and stuff. If you want to take a look at the inner workings of the game yourself, click here to download the source code.

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SQH Reviews, Written reviews

“Yarr, matey. Where me feathery flock at?” – Review of Nelly Cootalot: The Fowl Fleet

I’ve had the great fortune to spend the past handful of weeks playing a review copy of Nelly Cootalot: The Fowl Fleet, because the publishers with the auspicious name Application Systems thought I had journalistic integrity (joke’s on them), so I could tell you — on this, the day of her public unveiling (that’s a creepy sentence) — if it’s any good or not.

It is.

Can I go home now?

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Confessions of a Crap GameDev

Inspiration is really just picking out bits from things you like and mashing them together

So, you might ask, why am I making characters walk across the screen? For what purpose do they exist? Well, it stems from an overriding desire to just make games, a long spell of just having that urge without a story or device to hang it on, and from finally having an idea that recently gelled into my head.

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